AGENDA

The 2019 agenda is tentative and or subject to change.

7:30 AM – 8:00 AM

Registration, Networking and Breakfast

8:00 AM – 8:05 AM

Opening Remarks

8:05 AM – 8:35 AM

Keynote

Mr. David Luber
Executive Director, U.S. Cyber Command

8:35 AM – 9:20 AM

CYBERSECURITY SUPPLY CHAIN RISKS 

One of the Pentagon’s primary cybersecurity concerns is that its supply chain, and specifically its second and third tier contractors, don’t have sufficient security standards in place, leaving huge vulnerabilities in weapons systems. This panel will explore how to manage the risks associated with the supply chain, what kind of standards industry should have to follow, and how those standards could change Pentagon acquisition practices – for better and for worse.

Mr. Bill Stephens,
Director of Counterintelligence, Defense Security Service

Mr. Jon Boyens,
Acting Deputy Chief of the Computer Security Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology

Dan Smith,
Vice President, Homeland Security Division, Mantech

9:20 AM – 9:50 AM

Networking Break

9:50 AM – 10:35 AM

ENHANCING THE GOVERNMENT’S CYBER WORKFORCE

How does the government entice both young talent and seasoned cyber professionals to consider working with them when private industry offers seemingly unbeatable financial incentives? Once you have staff with top-level skills, how do you retain them? Staffing and talent are among the government’s top cyber problems. This panel will explore what steps have worked, what new programs are underway and how the government can find what the people they need?

Mr. Gary Washington,
Chief Information Officer, Department of Agriculture

Rick Wagner,
President, Mission, Cyber & Intelligence Solutions Group, Mantech

10:35 AM – 11:05 AM

Keynote

Ms. Jeanette Manfra,
Assistant Director for Cybersecurity, Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, Department of Homeland Security

11:05 AM – 11:50 AM

MISSION CRITICAL: WHAT DO AGENCIES NEED TODAY?

While it’s easy to view cyber through a future-forward lens, attacks are ever-present and ongoing. The current infrastructure and policies for governance in the area of cyber aren’t equipped to provide total security.  This panel will explore the most imminent needs of the military and federal agencies. What types of technologies are they looking to invest in? What kind of infrastructure and skills are needed?

11:50 AM – 12:50 PM

NETWORKING LUNCHEON

12:50 PM – 1:35 PM

ASSSESSING THE HUMAN THREAT

How do the actions of people heighten the cyber security threat? Even with all the security measures implemented, agencies and organizations sometimes still allow employees to use private or personal email accounts to conduct business, encourage the use of Dropbox, OneNote and Google Drive, or sanction Bring-Your-Own-Devices (BYOD) and the ability to download Software-as-a-Service (Saas) applications. How can agencies more effectively mitigate these risks? How can they help train employees to avoid phishing attacks and to understand the dangers of shadow IT?

1:35 PM – 2:05 PM

NETWORKING BREAK

2:05 – 2:35 PM

KEYNOTE

2:35 PM – 3:20 PM

WHAT HAVE WE LEARNED FROM INTERNATIONAL CYBER EVENTS 

In later 2015, Russian hackers reportedly took control of three Ukranian electricity companies and caused power outages for 200,000 consumers. How do other governments deal with attacks to critical infrastructure? What are examples of some of the biggest attacks globally? What was done right/wrong in handling these events?

3:20 PM – 3:30 PM

Closing Remarks

  

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